SimpleTest

.code { border-width: thin; border-style: dotted; border-color: red; size: 12pt; background: black; color: lime; } .output { border-width: thin; border-style: solid; border-color: red; size: 12pt; background: black; color: cyan; } div.indent { margin-left: 1.5em; width: 100%; } A while back I was working on a site, and as I was writing the back end and making sure that it works properly I thought to myself "If .NET has nunit, and Java has junit, does PHP have phpunit, or something similar?" After some digging I found the answer. The answer I found was yes! In addition to finding unit frame works for PHP I also found some for other languages like ada, haskell and so on:aunit - for Ada hunit - for Haskell ant-junit - Apache Ant's optional tasks depending on junit dbunit - DBUnit is a JUnit extension targeted for database-driven pr ojects. tagunit - for testing custom JSP tags xmlunit - for XML and so on. If you want a complete list, on the command prompt, if you're using Gentoo, just type:

Continue Reading

Eclipse, PHP, and XDebug

.code { border-width: thin; border-style: dotted; border-color: red; size: 12pt; background: black; color: lime; } .output { border-width: thin; border-style: solid; border-color: red; size: 12pt; background: black; color: cyan; } div.indent { margin-left: 1.5em; width: 100%; } In the past I've written how to use Eclipse with phpdbg and ZendDebugger. The phpdbg was short lived as it was replaced with xdebug. According to Zend's website, they say that there are no serious limitations of xdebug. However, there may be some limitations when working with other Zend modules. This is not going to be a problem seeing as all I want to do use it to debug web pages. This will work on either Windows, Linux, and possibly MacOS X. Since posting about Eclipse and Zend, it has gotten much easier to get Eclipse and configure it for PHP. Go to Eclipse's homepage. On the front page there is a link to download the IDE for other languages; click on that and get the one for PHP.

Continue Reading

PHP, Zend Debugger, Eclipse

.code { border-width: thin; border-style: dotted; border-color: red; size: 12pt; background: black; color: lime; } .output { border-width: thin; border-style: solid; border-color: red; size: 12pt; background: black; color: cyan; } div.indent { margin-left: 1.5em; width: 100%; } A while ago I wrote how you can configure Eclipse, PHP on a Linux machine to debug PHP pages using phpdbg. At first this worked very well but after a while break point wouldn't work and I would have to restart the session. Another problem that I was having was that the session information was saved. I got around this by clearing out the session information in Firefox. This continued until one day when I tried to start a new debug session and all I got was this: At that point I decided to dump phpdbg and start using the Zend Debugger. Getting the extension to work properly took some time. After many hours of searching the Internet I managed to find a decent site to work off of. Unfortunately, it was aimed at the Windows platform. Getting PHP and eclipse configured was half the battle that I faced.

Continue Reading

Software RAID, Hardware RAID, and Woes Oh My!

.code { border-width: thin; border-style: dotted; border-color: red; size: 12pt; background: black; color: lime; } .output { border-width: thin; border-style: solid; border-color: red; size: 12pt; background: black; color: cyan; } div.indent { margin-left: 1.5em; width: 100%; } I woke up on Halloween to the sound of my music playing. Then all of a sudden it stopped. I got up not thinking much of it. The first thing I do when I get up in the morning is check my email. When Thunderbird didn't open and programs stopped responding I got suspicious. I dropped in to VT12 to see what was going on. What was being reported was:

Continue Reading

Gentoo on an HP Pavilion dv5000 (dv5139)

tr { background: black; color: lime; } table { border-width: thin; border-color: #00FF00; size: 12pt; width: 100% } div.indent { margin-left: 1.5em; width: 100%; } When my Compaq Presario X1000 (X1010US) died I was sad. It took me some time to get gentoo to work correctly with the hardware. The biggest hurdle that I faced was getting the wireless to work. At the time ndiswrapper wasn't working very well and would often either lock up my system or cause a kernel panic. The second hurdle that I faced was getting 3d acceleration to work. When I was forced to give up the ghost on my beloved Compaq Presario X1000 I ended up purcharsing a HP Pavilion dv5000 (dv5139).AMD Turion 64 ML-37 (2.0Ghz) 2x1GB DDR333 120GB 5400 RPM Seagate HD 15.4" Wide 1280x800 ATI XPRESS 200M 8x DVD-RW DL with lightscribe 54a/b/g wireless Bluetooth Windows XP MCE 2005 ( which was wiped out right after removing it from the box ) Again, I was having problems with the wireless and video. The laptop has a bcm4319 chip and from what I've read, the native Linux kernel only has drivers that support the bcm4318 and earlier. However, I was able to get the ndiswrapper to work with the Windows drivers. The video card took a lot of monkeying around with but after many many hours I was able to get it to work. Unforunately there are some strange bugs in the driver such as once X starts you can't switch back to the VT without seeing some tripy colours.

Continue Reading

Tri-Monitors

I've acquired another 19" LCD monitor from a customer who said that he no longer needed it as the DVI IN no longer functions. Setting up Dual monitors is pretty easy. Unfortunately, there's a problem when using Linux and multiple monitors. The problem is that the window manager does not handle them correctly (or like Windows does.) If you've ever set up dual monitors on a Windows machine you can 'Attach' the second output via the Display Properties. There is also an option that allows you to extend the desktop to the second monitor. When you extend the desktop to the second monitor and you maximize a window, the window will take up both screens. If you simply 'Attach' the monitor then when you maximize the window, it will fill up the screen that it is on. There's also a bonus here, you can drag the window to the other screen with out any problems. In Linux you can do one of two things:

  1. You can extend the display to all the monitors, which will make all connected monitors one massive screen.
  2. Setup individual screens. The draw backs to this is that each screen will have a separate instance of the Windows Manager of your choice, you can not run multiple instances of some programs such as Fire Fox, and finally you can not drag windows from one screen to the other.

Continue Reading
  • 1
  • 2
Close Menu